When a rhino’s eyes bleed, it could mean a quick death

The horns of a rhinoceros, which are the largest in the world, are so thick that they can easily slice through flesh.

The horns, however, can also cause bleeding in the eyes of some people.

The effects can be deadly.

And they happen when the animal is under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or under stress, according to a new study.

It found that a person who has recently been in a high-stress situation, such as being under a lot of stress, could bleed profusely, and their eyes could bleed too.

“The symptoms are very similar to what you see with someone who’s had a seizure,” said study researcher Robert Biedermann of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Biedere’s study, published Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to find a link between a person’s current level of stress and their blood loss. “

If you’ve ever been in that situation, you can imagine what happens.”

Biedere’s study, published Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to find a link between a person’s current level of stress and their blood loss.

It is based on data from an animal study that found that in an experiment that was designed to test the effects of stress on the body’s immune system, animals that had experienced high levels of stress in the past three weeks had significantly reduced levels of white blood cells, or white blood cell-producing cells, in their blood.

“We found that these animals were significantly more vulnerable to infection and a reduction in the number of white cells in their bloodstreams,” said Biederen.

He added that the finding indicates that the animals have the potential to transmit viruses and other pathogens, and that stress could increase the risk for the spread of those pathogens. “

These animals are the ones that are the hardest to deal with in a crisis, and they’re also the ones most likely to be stressed.”

He added that the finding indicates that the animals have the potential to transmit viruses and other pathogens, and that stress could increase the risk for the spread of those pathogens.

The rhinobrains horns are so large, and so hard to cut, that they bleed, causing bleeding in people The researchers also found that people with high levels and the highest levels of alcohol consumption, or heavy drinking, also had higher levels of a virus called COVID-19, which has been linked to increased bleeding in their eyes.

“People who had these high levels or the highest amounts of alcohol and COVID are more likely to have a high level of blood loss and also a higher risk for a bleeding in those eyes,” said the study’s lead author, Rohan K. Rajkumar of the Department of Psychology at the University at Buffalo.

“So people who are heavy drinkers are more susceptible to bleeding in that eye area.”

Rajkural, who also studies stress, said he had seen some of the same patterns in people in his research.

“There’s some research that suggests that people who drink more are more prone to getting a bleeding infection,” he said.

“And, of course, a lot can happen before that bleeding actually occurs.”

The new study is not the first that has found links between stress and bleeding in eyes.

A study published in 2016 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine found that animals who were stressed in stressful situations, such a a battle or a fight, had a higher rate of bleeding in a particular region of their eye.

But that study didn’t have enough data to find causation.

In the new study, Rajkuram and his colleagues used the latest evidence from animal studies to show that the risk of bleeding was greatest in animals that were under stress.

“All of the animals were in the stress-induced state for a period of time, and it’s only when they start to recover from that stress that they begin to regrow,” he told ABC News.

“What we found was that they’re still very susceptible to getting blood loss in their eye region and also to a reduction of the number and the amount of white cell-bearing cells in the blood.

And we also found, for those animals, that the decrease in the amount and the frequency of white white cells was related to the number that were bleeding in these animals.”

This study is the second to find that animals that are under stress have a lower likelihood of bleeding.

In 2014, researchers published a study that showed that animals in a stressful environment who had been exposed to the effects the virus had on their body, and who had suffered a traumatic event in their lives, had less red blood cells in that area of their body.

“As humans, we’re all exposed to stress and our immune systems have to respond in a way that we know is protective,” said Rajkurt.

“But there’s also a risk that if you don’t respond, that there will be a loss of white-blood cells in your body and the immune system will be compromised.”

He said he was intrigued by the