Bay window blinders to be removed from blinds in 2018

The UK government has confirmed it will remove blinds from some of its homes, citing concerns over potential eye damage and other safety risks.

The government is expected to release the decision next month, and says it will “take into account all available scientific information and advice”.

The announcement follows a report by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists which found that the risk of vision damage from the blinds was “increasingly apparent”.

The report also suggested that it was time for the government to move on from blind-friendly policies.

“It is clear that we must move on to a policy environment in which blinds are not an unavoidable part of the UK homes,” a spokesperson said.

“In line with our commitment to reducing eye damage in the home, we have already removed blinds on some properties and we will take further action to ensure that the blinding issue is taken seriously by all properties.” “

The UK has the second highest rate of blindness in Europe, after the US. “

In line with our commitment to reducing eye damage in the home, we have already removed blinds on some properties and we will take further action to ensure that the blinding issue is taken seriously by all properties.”

The UK has the second highest rate of blindness in Europe, after the US.

There are also concerns that the country’s existing blind-protection laws, which require blinds to be installed in all new homes, will be outdated in 2028.

Blind-blinding is illegal in the UK.

Blinds are already prohibited in most other European countries.

According to the RACO report: “The RCPI [Royal College of Optometrists] found that an estimated 11% of people will suffer visual impairment from their vision if they do not wear blinds.”

“We found that many blind people had experienced visual impairment, including those who were blind for a number of years, and those with severe visual impairments.”

“For some, they had no choice but to wear the blinders, as they did not have the resources to purchase the appropriate blinds or install them themselves.” “

They also experienced problems with the quality of their vision.”

“For some, they had no choice but to wear the blinders, as they did not have the resources to purchase the appropriate blinds or install them themselves.”

The report recommends that blind-blinds be removed in the homes of all people, regardless of age or health, and that people who have severe vision problems should not be able to access them.

Blinders have been banned in some European countries since 2009.

According a report from the International Federation of Blind People, which represents blind people in Europe: “Over 70% of the EU countries have already banned blind-blocking and there are plans to do so by 2025.”

The group says that “the EU has not adopted a ban on blind-blockings in the general population.”

The Royal College Of Optometrist’s report also highlighted the potential for damage to the eyes from using blinds and said it was “concerning that blind people are being exposed to this risk.”

The RACP also noted that there is no scientific evidence to suggest that wearing blinds would make people blind, but said that the risks could be increased if people wear them more than once a day.